City of Santa Cruz names Rosemary Menard as Water Director

Rosemary MenardWe are excited to announce our first placement of 2014: Ms. Rosemary Menard, City of Santa Cruz’ new Water Director.  Menard begins her new position in Santa Cruz with more than 30 years experience in water planning and management, as well as regulatory and environmental issues.

“We are very pleased to have Ms. Menard come aboard at a critical point in our water supply discussions,” said Santa Cruz City Manager Martín Bernal in statement. “She brings a wealth of leadership and experience in water operations, conservation, administration and policy to our organization.

In a recent interview, Menard said she pursued the Santa Cruz job because “I feel like the kind of strategic and analytical and public participation experience I have lend themselves to tackling big thorny issues.”

Menard’s previous leadership includes two roles within Washoe County, Nevada government and various management positions in the Portland (Ore.) Water Bureau and Seattle Water Department.  Menard has received the Distinguished Service Award by the Association of Metropolitan Water Agencies. The San Leandro native received bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Washington.

Menard takes the post as Santa Cruz undertakes a new public-led study of how to manage its drought-prone water supply for 90,000 customers with an eye toward long-term sustainability.

City of Aliso Viejo names new City Manager

David Doyle City Manager City of Aliso Viejo

This week, the City of Aliso Viejo named David Doyle as its new City Manager.  Doyle begins his new role on February 10, 2013.   “What we appreciated from David as a candidate is that he had creative ideas for supporting and implementing our top goals,” said the City’s Mayor, Carmen Cave.  With more than 20 years in municipal government, Doyle brings a wealth of experience and perspective to the young city.  We are very proud of this placement and wish both the City of Aliso Viejo and David Doyle all the best in the upcoming years.

Weimiller’s new role as City Administrator for the City of Lompoc, CA.

Patrick Wiemiller, Lompoc City Administrator
Patrick Wiemiller, Lompoc City Administrator

We are proud to announce Patrick Wiemiller as the new City Administrator for the City of Lompoc, California. Most recently, Patrick led both the Public Works and Utilities Departments for the City of Fresno overseeing 887 employees and an annual budget of $574 million. “I am thrilled to be the individual chosen and look forward to working with the City Council, staff and community to enhance Lompoc’s economic vitality and build upon the city’s numerous assets,” offered Wiemiller.

Please join us in welcoming Weimiller to the City of Lompoc as he begins his new role on January 6, 2014.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

December 3, 2013
Contact: Mayor John Linn
(805) 315-7058

Lompoc Names New City Administrator

The Lompoc City Council announced the selection of a new City Administrator this evening. Patrick Wiemiller, who currently serves as the City of Fresno’s Public Works and Public Utilities Director, has been named as the Council’s unanimous choice to lead the full-service city with nearly 400 employees.

Mayor John Linn made the announcement at the December 3rd regularly scheduled City Council meeting. “Patrick brings an impressive level of executive management and leadership experience to the City and is well-equipped to help lead our organization for many years to come,” commented the Mayor. “We had a number of highly qualified candidates who were attracted to Lompoc, however, Patrick’s history of public service excellence and efficiency in California stood out,” he added.

Wiemiller currently oversees both the Public Works and Utilities Departments for the City of Fresno, where he has served for nearly 13 years. He is responsible for overseeing a total of 887 employees and an annual budget of over $574 million. According to the candidate, he was attracted to the Lompoc opportunity because of the City’s strong sense of community and promising potential. “I am thrilled to be the individual chosen and look forward to working with the City Council, staff and community to enhance Lompoc’s economic vitality and build upon the city’s numerous assets,” offered Wiemiller.

To date in his career, Wiemiller has served local government in the Central Valley including the City of Tracy and the Fresno Irrigation District, in addition to the City of Fresno. He holds a Master of Business Administration degree from California State University at Fresno and a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration/ Finance from the same institution.

Lompoc’s new City Administrator will be paid a base salary of $175,000. Wiemiller is scheduled to begin serving in his new role beginning on January 6, 2014, pending the completion of pre-employment checks required for all new city employees.

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Gitelman’s new role as Director of Planning & Community Environment of Palo Alto, CA

Hillary E. Gitelman, Palo Alto Director of Planning and Community Environment.
Hillary E. Gitelman, Palo Alto Director of Planning and Community Environment.

We are proud to announce Hillary E. Gitelman’s return to the Bay Area as Palo Alto’s new Director of Planning and Community Environment. She brings with her a wide range of impressive experiences and accomplishments.  As Hillary’s first week comes to a close, we celebrate her success and our partnership with this incredible city.  Read Palo Alto’s official Press Release below:

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

9/10/2013
Subject : Hillary E. Gitelman Named Palo Alto Director of Planning & Community Environment
Contact : Claudia Keith, Chief Communications Officer 650-329-2607

Palo Alto, CA – City Manager James Keene announced today that he has selected Hillary E. Gitelman to serve as the City’s next Director of Planning and Community Environment, and will bring her appointment to the City Council on September 16 for confirmation. Gitelman currently serves as the Director of Planning, Building and Environmental Services for Napa County. She is expected to begin in her new position on October 28 at a salary of $197,500. The selection was made following a national search and recruitment process that included extensive input from community and business stakeholders as well as two interview panels with broad representation from the community.

“Hillary was our top candidate and we are fortunate to have someone with her breadth of experience join the City in this critical leadership position as we address the very complex planning and development issues facing us today and in the future,” said City Manager James Keene. “The role of Director of Planning is central to the future of our city. This is an especially important point in time for Palo Alto. The Director position requires a person with the drive to make necessary changes in our plans and policies and to meet the demands of our community, and do so with diplomacy, and a commitment to inclusiveness and open government. Hillary brings all of these qualities to her new role and will be a tremendous asset to Palo Alto.”

For the past eight years, Gitelman has directed Napa County’s Department of Planning, Building and Environmental Services where she leads a staff of 70 and is responsible for current and long-range planning, engineering and conservation, parks, environmental health, building permits and code enforcement. From 2001 to 2004, she directed the planning department of the Presidio Trust, a federal agency established to preserve the Presidio of San Francisco for public use while making the park financially self-sufficient. As part of this role, she was responsible for developing the award-winning Presidio Trust Management Plan, as well as the PresidiGo shuttle system, and parking management program, among others.

Gitelman also served as the Environmental Review Officer for the San Francisco Planning Department, where she was responsible for the City and County’s compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act and related laws. During her decade-long tenure with the City and County of San Francisco, she conducted major environmental reviews for PacBell (now AT&T) Park, the Mission Bay Redevelopment Project, the Mid-Embarcadero Roadway, the Third Street Light Rail Project, and many other private and public projects.

Previously, she held increasingly senior positions in planning and historic preservation, and is affiliated with the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association; the Association of Environmental Professionals; the American Planning Association and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Gitelman holds a bachelor’s degree in the history of art from Yale and a master’s degree in historic preservation from Columbia University, School of Architecture, Planning & Preservation.

“I am thrilled to have this opportunity, and look forward to working with the staff and citizens of Palo Alto on a wide variety of planning and transportation issues,” said Gitelman.

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Time for a Corporate Culture Makeover ?

Although recovery is benefiting many sectors of our economy, organizations find that simply throwing money at high performers turns out to be an ineffective means of retaining top talent. Money rarely ranks at the top of “why I love my job” list. As competition for stellar employees and executives grows increasingly fierce, many organizations could use a “culture makeover” to enhance the likelihood of hanging onto their superstars.

In her book The Progress Principle, Harvard Professor Teresa Amabile calls attention to the significance of making progress in meaningful work as the most powerful positive event from which employees derive satisfaction. In interviewing hundreds of candidates each year, we hear a lot of complaints about culture and it’s often the impetus for someone to initiate the process of changing jobs

Here are the top four missing culture characteristics consistently cited:

1. Flexibility. Whether it’s wanting more time with the kids, tending to the needs of aging parents, learning a new language or having the option to work remotely on occasion, your best performers value flexibility around when, where and how they get their work done. Today more than ever, flexibility is highly coveted.

2. Connection. A frequently cited disappointment conveyed by front-line workers is a missing connection between their contributions and the bigger picture. This disconnect is commonly framed as, “Where are we going?” or “Why are we doing ‘this’?”. And when such a disconnect exists, employees also question how meaningful their work is and if their superiors even really know what they do.

3. Clarity. Employees crave clear expectations, roles, career paths, boundaries, and how success is defined for them. Managers often assure us that their employees know exactly what is expected of them and are aware of what constitutes desired results and success. When we talk to their employees, however, it’s not uncommon to find a mutual understanding that can be described as “blurry” at best.

4. Communications. The most prominent weakness we hear universally cited by employees at all levels is the desire for greater communications and information. The lack of communication impacts their commitment, ownership, pride and productivity. While it’s nice to hear directly from the Chief Executive, most employees report that a variety of communication strategies from their bosses help keep them engaged, informed and energized about their work. Electronic newsletters, regular meetings, video messages and even an occasional old fashioned handwritten note are all effective tools for satisfying the hunger for information and personal acknowledgement.

While employees want to listen, they also want to be heard. In order to feel truly valued, they want to offer up ideas, share constructive criticism, convey customer feedback and contribute strategically to the big picture.

Today, we’re all bogged down by too much information, competing priorities and technology tools tempting us to be available 24/7. Dedicating time and energy to culture is often viewed as optional by many leaders and only gets tended to when something goes horribly wrong or a pattern of fleeing employees comes to the attention of management. Don’t wait for a crisis to be concerned about employee retention and the reputation of your corporate culture. What change can you make in your environment to strengthen the magnetic force of your workplace?

Permission to reprint granted so long as article is published in its entirety and author is credited with the following:

Teri Black is a lifelong student of high performance and success and is President/CEO of a Los Angeles based executive search firm dedicated to serving the public sector. Teri Black & Company, LLC has recruited hundreds of local government executives for communities across the western United States.

Copyright 2013 Teri Black & Company, LLC. For more information, please contact us. Don’t forget to sign-up for TBC updates; connect with us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn!